Comments
yourfanat wrote: I am using another tool for Oracle developers - dbForge Studio for Oracle. This IDE has lots of usefull features, among them: oracle designer, code competion and formatter, query builder, debugger, profiler, erxport/import, reports and many others. The latest version supports Oracle 12C. More information here.
Cloud Expo on Google News
SYS-CON.TV
Cloud Expo & Virtualization 2009 East
PLATINUM SPONSORS:
IBM
Smarter Business Solutions Through Dynamic Infrastructure
IBM
Smarter Insights: How the CIO Becomes a Hero Again
Microsoft
Windows Azure
GOLD SPONSORS:
Appsense
Why VDI?
CA
Maximizing the Business Value of Virtualization in Enterprise and Cloud Computing Environments
ExactTarget
Messaging in the Cloud - Email, SMS and Voice
Freedom OSS
Stairway to the Cloud
Sun
Sun's Incubation Platform: Helping Startups Serve the Enterprise
POWER PANELS:
Cloud Computing & Enterprise IT: Cost & Operational Benefits
How and Why is a Flexible IT Infrastructure the Key To the Future?
Click For 2008 West
Event Webcasts
The End of the Beginning
The End of the Beginning

I guess the title begs the question, if this is the end of the beginning, is it the beginning of the end? Hardly. But it is time to close the book on the first phase of Web services - the beginning of the hype curve.

Almost a year ago we decided that Web services would receive enough attention that we should consider devoting an entire magazine to the topic. We started with two teaser issues, one of which came out this time last year, and the response was dramatic enough that it justified our existence. In fact, WSJ is one of the fastest-growing titles in the history of SYS-CON Media.

This really has nothing to do with the end of the beginning, but it sets the stage well. A year ago we were all discussing possibilities. Would .NET catch on? Would Java support Web services? We even wondered exactly what Web services was and who was going to use it.

Some of the initial thoughts were grandiose and off base, but in general we got it right. Many of the initial visionaries and evangelists of Web services pictured a world where people could look up any service they wanted and then simply invoke it - on the Web, across the Web. This vision was coupled with the ultimate scenario, one in which companies exposed their business processes to one another via a global directory service. While the possibility still exists, we've seen that in the near term, companies are largely content to use Web services to integrate their own internal processes first.

What's become apparent in the year since we started exploring this topic is that Web services has achieved critical mass. It has enough horsepower to be a viable player in the market.

How can we judge this? Largely by the fundamental shift in the thought processes of vendors and implementers, from the realm of trial applications and rough-hewn support fit only for hardcore developers to the domain of working implementations and smooth packages aimed at high-level developers and business users.

Adding WSDL, UDDI, and SOAP support was relatively easy for the J2EE vendors, and Microsoft built it on top of their platform. Even a large number of vendors who aren't in the application server business provide a Web services stack. At this point it's not a question of where to get a UDDI provider, but which UDDI provider to use.

There are already choices for Web services deployments - multiple choices, with increasingly large numbers of referenceable implementations. What really starts to point to the next step in the evolution of Web services is the rise of companies focusing on two entirely different aspects of provisioning: ease of use and management of service.

On the one hand we have a variety of vendors building workbenches, IDEs, suites - all designed to make it easier to develop and deploy a Web service without ever having to actually write WSDL. These are the tools that take Web services from the esoteric realm of the hardcore developer into the realm of corporate America. These are the tools we really need for Web services to become endemic.

On the other hand, there's management. Web services, like any other corporate asset, needs to be watched, managed, and measured. Service-level agreements are meaningless without tools to measure the ability of a service to comply with them. Much like application servers, Web services won't fully penetrate the corporate infrastructure until it can be managed by a corporate management application such as Tivoli, Unicenter, or OpenView. As in the tools domain, vendors are debuting products that make Web services an integral player within the management space.

So it's the end of the beginning. But not to worry, it's not the beginning of the end.

About Sean Rhody
Sean Rhody is the founding-editor (1999) and editor-in-chief of SOA World Magazine. He is a respected industry expert on SOA and Web Services and a consultant with a leading consulting services company. Most recently, Sean served as the tech chair of SOA World Conference & Expo 2007 East.

In order to post a comment you need to be registered and logged in.

Register | Sign-in

Reader Feedback: Page 1 of 1

Latest Cloud Developer Stories
In this presentation, you will learn first hand what works and what doesn't while architecting and deploying OpenStack. Some of the topics will include:- best practices for creating repeatable deployments of OpenStack- multi-site considerations- how to customize OpenStack to inte...
"IBM is really all in on blockchain. We take a look at sort of the history of blockchain ledger technologies. It started out with bitcoin, Ethereum, and IBM evaluated these particular blockchain technologies and found they were anonymous and permissionless and that many companies...
Everyone wants the rainbow - reduced IT costs, scalability, continuity, flexibility, manageability, and innovation. But in order to get to that collaboration rainbow, you need the cloud! In this presentation, we'll cover three areas: First - the rainbow of benefits from cloud co...
Founded in 2000, Chetu Inc. is a global provider of customized software development solutions and IT staff augmentation services for software technology providers. By providing clients with unparalleled niche technology expertise and industry experience, Chetu has become the prem...
René Bostic is the Technical VP of the IBM Cloud Unit in North America. Enjoying her career with IBM during the modern millennial technological era, she is an expert in cloud computing, DevOps and emerging cloud technologies such as Blockchain. Her strengths and core competencies...
Subscribe to the World's Most Powerful Newsletters
Subscribe to Our Rss Feeds & Get Your SYS-CON News Live!
Click to Add our RSS Feeds to the Service of Your Choice:
Google Reader or Homepage Add to My Yahoo! Subscribe with Bloglines Subscribe in NewsGator Online
myFeedster Add to My AOL Subscribe in Rojo Add 'Hugg' to Newsburst from CNET News.com Kinja Digest View Additional SYS-CON Feeds
Publish Your Article! Please send it to editorial(at)sys-con.com!

Advertise on this site! Contact advertising(at)sys-con.com! 201 802-3021



SYS-CON Featured Whitepapers
ADS BY GOOGLE